How Do I Become a Sports Announcer?

Learn about the educational background and skills that will help you obtain a job as a sports announcer. Find out ways that you can gain experience in the field as a volunteer or intern. Read more about the different types of sports announcers, and review how much they typically earn. Schools offering Communications degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

What Education Do I Need to Become a Sports Announcer?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), you may need formal training in broadcasting, which you may achieve through bachelor's degrees in journalism, broadcasting or communications (www.bls.gov). Within these programs, you may learn how to write and edit your work, as well as learning to present material in print, on camera or over the radio. You may also build experience using electronics and computer equipment and software.

What Skills Do I Need?

You can become one of several types of sports announcers: play-by-play announcer, color commentator or studio sports show host. Play-by-play announcers provide ongoing commentary about the game, while color commentators assist the play-by-play announcers by filling up dead air with stats or other background information. Studio sports show hosts are found on radio or television where they discuss sports subjects.

To become an effective sports announcer in any of these areas, you must have a strong knowledge of sports and an engaging personality. Since most sporting events occur in the evening, you may be expected to work late in the evening and maintain irregular hours. Some employers state that you must have considerable experience in a broadcast newsroom or game reporting experience, according to January 2011 job postings on SimplyHired.com.

What About Experience?

Competition for paying jobs may be fierce, but you may be able to gain experience working as a volunteer sports announcer at high school sporting events. Bachelor's degree programs in a communications-based program may offer unpaid internship positions through campus radio or television stations, both of which may provide on-the-job training as well as offering a chance to network with industry members. Paid internships or entry-level sports announcing jobs may be available at colleges or universities, in which you need little, if any, previous announcing experience, according to January 2011 job postings on SimplyHired.com.

What Salary Should I Expect?

Compensation for sports announcers may vary based upon location, experience and size of your audience. The annual salary range for the middle 50% of sports announcers was $21,913-$57,790 as of January 2011, according to PayScale.com. Most jobs are low-paying, except for those in large markets for established sports media conglomerates.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

  • 1. Degree Options:

Popular Schools

  • Grand Canyon University

    Grand Canyon University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Grand Canyon University:

    Online Programs Available

  • Sanford-Brown

    Sanford-Brown responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Sanford-Brown:

    • Bachelor Degrees
    • Associate Programs

    Online and Campus-Based Programs Available:

    View All Locations
    • Anywhere: Online Campus
    • Florida: Tampa
    • Minnesota: Mendota Heights
    • Washington: Tukwila

 More Schools