How to Become a Surgical Assistant in 5 Steps

Surgical assistants help surgeons in the operating room. Find out the requirements to become a surgical assistant here, and review a step-by-step overview of how you can get started in this career. Review the requirements for certification. Schools offering Nursing degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

What Is a Surgical Assistant?

A surgical assistant is an allied health professional who works under the direction of a surgeon and assists in performing technical surgical functions, such as retracting tissues and organs, cutting tissue, draining fluids, inserting and removing catheters, placing tourniquets, closing wounds and performing resuscitation as needed.

Other duties you may perform as a surgical assistant include selecting the appropriate instruments for each procedure, positioning and draping patients, confirming the procedure with the surgeon and selecting reference x-rays. You may assist in a specific type of surgery, such as orthopedic, obstetrical, craniofacial, cardiac, plastic, vascular or trauma surgery. You'll play an integral role in minimizing a patient's risk for nerve damage, decreased circulation and other health problems during his or her procedure.

Step 1: Research Career Options and Education Requirements

Surgical assisting programs vary in their admission requirements. Graduate-level certificate and degree programs in surgical assisting or physician's assisting require bachelor's or associate's degrees for admission, though undergraduate certificate and associate's degree programs in surgical first assisting are also available. Undergraduate programs do still require that you have certification and operating room experience in an allied profession, such as surgical technology, operating room nursing or physician assisting.

Whichever preliminary career you decide to pursue, you'll have multiple degree options that can all provide sufficient training to become a surgical assistant. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), surgical technology programs can last 9-24 months and may result in certificates, diplomas or associate's degrees (www.bls.gov). Registered nursing programs last 2-4 years and result in diplomas, associate's degrees or bachelor's degrees. Physician assistant programs can award certificates, associate's degrees, bachelor's degrees or master's degrees. However, physician assistant programs may require previous healthcare experience, which means that you'll have needed to complete a nursing, emergency medical technology, paramedic or related program prior to admission.

Step 2: Complete an Allied Health Program

Once you've decided which preliminary career you'd like to pursue to gain operating room experience, and you've researched the different program options, you can enroll in a training program. Allied health programs typically include both classroom and clinical instruction. Your curriculum will likely include science courses, such as microbiology, chemistry, anatomy, physiology and pharmacology. After you've completed your program, you must pass a certifying examination administered by an appropriate certifying body to gain admission to most surgical assisting programs.

Step 3: Gain Operating Room Experience

Most surgical assisting programs require operating room experience as a prerequisite, so you'll need to find employment after graduating from your allied health program. Some programs require at least three years of operating room experience. You should form good relationships with your employer and surgeons that you work with, since you may need to obtain letters of recommendation from them.

Step 4: Complete a Surgical Assisting Program

Surgical assisting programs can take 1-2 years to complete, and they typically result in a certificate upon completion. Coursework may include microbiology, anesthesia methods, pharmacology and wound closure techniques. You'll also receive clinical instruction in surgical assisting. Additional requirements may include passing a physical exam, earning cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification, obtaining health insurance, getting vaccinated and clearing a drug screening.

Step 5: Earn Certification

Certification in surgical assisting is offered by the National Board of Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting (NBSTSA), the National Surgical Assistant Association (NSAA) and the American Board of Surgical Assistants (ABSA). Each of these organizations requires that you periodically renew your certification. You may need to earn continuing education credits or take an examination in order to recertify.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

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