What Can I Do with a Master's Degree in Educational Psychology?

Educational psychology explores topics such as the ways that humans learn. Read on to learn about positions you could qualify for upon earning a master's degree in this field, and explore their typical job duties. Schools offering Educational Psychology degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

Overview of the Educational Psychology Field

Professionals in the educational psychology field study how learning happens and find ways to facilitate the education process. The information that educational psychologists discover is not limited to application in schools; educational psychologists sometimes dedicate themselves to creating instructional methods for adults in the workplace. If this interests you, you could study the ways motivation and goals affect learning. You might also create methods that help teachers overcome learning obstacles or improve assessment systems, depending on your interests.

Jobs for Master's Degree-Holders

The focus of your master's degree program will help determine the types of jobs for which you'll be eligible. If you enter a program that deals largely with education, you'll probably be prepared to work for a school system. If you choose a program with a focus on psychology or theoretical applications, you might be better suited for a research career. Keep in mind that to be a practicing psychologist in any setting, such as a school, you must hold a license to practice in your state.

School Psychologist

As a school psychologist, you'll make the learning process easier for students. This often entails finding solutions for barriers to students' learning, such as social or emotional problems, behavioral issues and learning disorders. You might also work with parents, administrators and teachers to develop education plans for disabled or gifted students. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, some states require you to obtain an education specialist degree (Ed.S.) to become a school psychologist, while others will accept a master's degree in educational psychology (www.bls.gov).

Researcher

Researchers make up a substantial portion of educational psychology professionals. Beyond simply studying how schoolchildren learn, these researchers study the learning process as it occurs at all stages of life. They might develop new methods of instruction or create training programs for government agencies and corporations. You may qualify for such research positions by earning a master's degree in educational psychology, although in some cases you'll be required to hold a Ph.D. in the field.

Beyond a Master's Degree

If you'd like to enlarge your career prospects, you might consider earning a Ph.D. in educational psychology. Employers often look for job candidates with this degree, because the educational psychology field is highly specialized. Possible jobs for Ph.D. holders include research positions for public and private organizations, administrative positions in the public school system or teaching positions in universities and colleges.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

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