What Are the Educational Requirements to Become a Dentist?

Prospective dentists may earn either a Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) or a Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) degree. Learn the education options for a dentist as well as the licensure requirements and specialty options. Schools offering Dental Assisting degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

What Educational Requirements Must I Fulfill to Become a Dentist?

Before applying to dental school, you'll first need to complete an accredited, 4-year bachelor's degree program. The curriculum generally includes both general education and major coursework. Once you make the decision to become a dentist, you can major in a science-related field to meet the coursework requirements for admittance to an approved dental school. Alternatively, some schools may offer a pre-dental curriculum for you to enroll in. Your program of study may focus on such classes as biology, organic chemistry, physics, calculus, physiology and human genetics.

You'll take the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) after you've earned your bachelor's degree to ensure you're prepared for dental school training. Your dental school should be fully accredited by the American Dental Association's (ADA) Commission on Dental Accreditation. Dental school usually lasts four years, and it leads to a Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) or Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) degree. A DDS and a DMD are equivalent and meet the same curriculum requirements, according to the ADA (www.ada.org).

The first two years of your dental school program will be dedicated to classroom study and laboratory projects. In the final two years of the program, you'll gain clinical experience under the supervision of practicing dentists. You might participate in classes such as operative dentistry, gross anatomy, oral medicine and histology. When you graduate from dental school, you'll need to pass the required state examinations to become licensed before practicing dentistry.

How Do I Become Licensed?

Once you earn a dental degree from an accredited school, you must pass both written and clinical portions of the National Board Dental Examination. This test may be administered by your state. The results of the examination help state boards assess your dental qualifications and knowledge of biomedical and dental sciences. You may become licensed to practice both general and specialized dentistry.

What Areas Might I Specialize In?

Many dentists become general practitioners, but additional training will be necessary if you'd like to specialize in a particular area of dentistry. Some areas you could specialize in include prosthodontics, orthodontics, endodontics or pediatric dentistry. Prosthodontists improve the oral health and appearance of patients by restoring missing teeth. Orthodontists straighten teeth with braces and other apparatuses, while an endodontist specializes in the treatment of diseased or injured tooth pulp. Pediatric dentists provide dental services for children.

You must complete between 2-4 years of postgraduate study in your specialty, along with a 2-year postgraduate residency. In addition, you may be required to take a special state-administered examination. Once your training has been completed, you may pursue voluntary board certification in your specialty.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

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